Video : Kigali Genocide Museum

Youtube travel video - 'Kigali Genocide Museum'. This is a top rated video clip taken in the destination of Kigali in the province of Kigali in the country of Rwanda. You can use the video player menu to view full screen, or click on the link below to see more videos by this publisher. All videos on this site are displayed according to YouTube Terms of Service

Rwanda is celebrating and believe me they have a lot to celebrate after 20 years of peace! Exact numbers killed are of course difficult to verify but it likely well over a million people, which for a country as tiny as Rwanda is about 1 in 5. We do know that at least 500,000 people were killed in a mere 100 days after the assassination of Juvénal Habyarimana and Cyprien Ntaryamira on April 6 through mid-July in 1994. It's also quite difficult to guess the exact start date of the genocide because the definition of genocide wasn't even recognized internationally until 1948. I would personally put the start of their troubles at 1933 when the then ruling Belgians organized a census and mandated that everyone be issued an identity card classifying them as either Tutsi, Hutu, or Twa. This, then started the tensions that led to an eventual genocide. Many people are familiar with Rwanda both because of it's unusual name and the association with the famous fact based movie "Hotel Rwanda". But that was then and this is now and things have changed dramatically in the 20 years since the violence officially ended. How's this for a start? fastest growing economy in Africa (and they are a tiny land locked country), one of the least corrupt countries in the world ranking 50 out of 176 countries worldwide and certainly the least in Africa, by a long shot. www.transparency.org So how did they do it? To start with it's pretty hard to tell a Tutsi from a Hutu, or Twa. While visiting on a sponsored tour of Rwanda I asked several of our local guides where the differenced started. Most either did not know, did not care or just didn't want to say. Without any way to really distinguish between people there's really no way to figure out what to fight about. Sounds simple enough but then of course you have people that were lucky to survive and maybe with them being the only one left of an entire family. What do you say if you meet the killer(s) (which is entirely possible in a country that small). "Forgiveness" is the one word I heard repeatedly which of course we all know intuitively is the only way to move on at some point. But forgiveness is much more than a word, it's a whole lot of pain that the people of Rwanda finally agreed they had enough of. How many countries can honestly say that they do not know what racial discrimination is anymore? I'm prepared to say this is probably the only country in the world to have this beautiful reputation. And that is but one reason a country would open several museums of genocide. The horrendous sacrifices made by millions ultimately led to a society that boasts no discrimination, no hatred and no animosity. If your next travel plans find you in East Africa, I sincerely hope that you make the opportunity to be welcomed with open, loving forgiving hands by not only all the people of Rwanda but the spectacular Gorilla's and Chimps that all choose to make this their part of the world their sacred home. You can find a lot of helpful travel advice on line or simply shoot me an email percyvonlipinski gmail Produced and Hosted by Percy von Lipinski Special Thanks to the USAID team and all the other travel journalists that put up with me for far too long and you know who you are! Special, Special thanks to His Excellency President, Paul Kagame for being one of the finest human beings on earth